Weed of the Month

Learn about noxious weeds and steps you can take to manage or eradicate.  Each month we will bring you a new profile and helpful resources.

December Weed Profile

Field Bindweed

Convolvulus arvensis

Field bindweed is a List C vining perennial in the morning glory family (Convolvulaceae).

Known to be in North America since the 1700s and in Colorado since 1872, it was introduced as a contaminant of seed. It can now be found in all 50 states. It is a native to Eurasia and Asia and naturalized in many other areas.

It has a thick taproot that can grow to 20-30 feet deep and multiple horizontal rhizomes with buds that form new plants. Plants can easily regrow from root fragments. The root mass can reach 2½ to 5 tons per acre.

The trumpet shaped flowers form in the leaf axis. Flowers form from late spring until frost. The 1-inch-wide flowers are white to pink and have two small bracts that form ½ to 2 inches below the flower.

Each flower produces a roundish fruit that contains 2 to 4 seeds. The seeds can stay viable in the soil for 20+ years.

Field bindweed stems are 5+ feet long. They are twisted and are either prostrate or can climb and cover other plants, fences, and structures.

The 2-inch long and 1-inch-wide leaves are alternate, simple and arrow shaped, smaller towards the ends of the stems.

A serious pest in wheat and bean crops, it also invades vineyards, orchards, degraded rangelands, landscaped areas, and lawns. Field bindweed can harbor plant diseases (potato X disease, tomato spotted wilt, and vaccinium false bottom).

Control using cultural techniques and/or systemic herbicides. It requires persistent efforts over multiple years. The bindweed gall mite, Aceria malherbae has shown some good success in areas that are grazed or mowed.

Resources

Pacific Northwest Extension – Field bindweed (PDF)

http://smallgrains.wsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Field-Bindweed.pdf

National Park Service https://www.nps.gov/articles/field-bindweed.htm

Washington State University https://smallgrains.wsu.edu/weed-resources/common-weed-list/field-bindweed/

Items of Interest

Weed of the Month

2022

January Weed Profile – Knotweed

February Weed Profile – Rush Skeletonweed

March Weed Profile – Black Henbane

April Weed Profile – Chinese clematis

May Weed Profile – Houndstongue

June Weed Profile – Milk Thistle

July Weed Profile – Oxeye Daisy

August Weed Profile – Spotted Knapweed

September Weed Profile – Perennial Pepperweed

October Weed Profile – Yellow Flag Iris

November Weed Profile – Common St. Johns Wart

December Weed Profile – Field Bindweed

2021

January Weed Profile – Dalmatian Toadflax

February Weed Profile – Common Mulllein

March Weed Profile – Mediterranean Sage

April Weed Profile – Saltcedar

May Weed Profile – Absinth Wormwood 

June Weed Profile – Eurasian watermilfoil 

July Weed Profile – Yellow starthistle 

August Weed Profile – Hairy willowherb

September Weed Profile – Yellow toadflax

October Weed Profile – Chamomile

November Weed Profile – Diffuse knapweed

December Weed Profile – Poison hemlock

2020

January Weed Profile – Cheatgrass

February Weed Profile – Myrtle Spurge

March Weed Profile – Hoary Cress

April Weed Profile – Leafy Spurge

May Weed Profile – Scotch Thistle

June Weed Profile – Dyer’s Woad

July Weed Profile – Orange Hawkweed

August Weed Profile – Purple Loosestrife

September Weed Profile – Teasel

October Weed Profile – Canada Thistle

November Weed Profile – Russian Knapweed

December Weed Profile – Russian Olive